Syntax definitions

Syntax definitions have this form:

(define-syntax keyword transformer spec)

Keyword is an identifier, and the transformer spec is an instance of syntax-rules. Like variable definitions, syntax definitions can appear at the outermost level or nested within a body.

If the define-syntax occurs at the outermost level, then the global syntactic environment is extended by binding the keyword to the specified transformer, but previous expansions of any global binding for keyword remain unchanged. Otherwise, it is an internal syntax definition, and is local to the body in which it is defined. Any use of a syntax keyword before its corresponding definition is an error. In particular, a use that precedes an inner definition will not apply an outer definition.

(let ((x 1) (y 2)) (define-syntax swap! (syntax-rules () ((swap! a b) (let ((tmp a)) (set! a b) (set! b tmp))))) (swap! x y) (list x y)) ==> (2 1)

Macros can expand into definitions in any context that permits them. However, it is an error for a definition to define an identifier whose binding has to be known in order to determine the meaning of the definition itself, or of any preceding definition that belongs to the same group of internal definitions. Similarly, it is an error for an internal definition to define an identifier whose binding has to be known in order to determine the boundary between the internal definitions and the expressions of the body it belongs to. For example, the following are errors:

(define define 3) (begin (define begin list)) (let-syntax ((foo (syntax-rules () ((foo (proc args ...) body ...) (define proc (lambda (args ...) body ...)))))) (let ((x 3)) (foo (plus x y) (+ x y)) (define foo x) (plus foo x)))

husk-scheme online documentation rev 3.19.3 (2016.07.10)